Hemp Bill Signed by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

Hemp Bill Signed by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has signed into law legislation that aims to boost hemp production in the state.

According to the Associated Press, Governor Cuomo announced $10 million in state funds to boost industrial hemp research and development. The bill signed by Cuomo formally adds hemp to the state’s list of agricultural commodities and creates a hemp advisory panel.

According to Governor Cuomo, hemp holds great potential for New York’s agricultural and biotechnology industries. A state program launched last year allows farmers to partner with universities to grow and research hemp.

According to congressional research, the United States imports over half a billion dollars in hemp from other countries – primarily China and Canada – while retaining the illegality of its cultivation among its own farmers. According to the same report, the hemp market to consist of over roughly 25,000 various products.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Tue, 25 Jul 2017 19:48:05 +0000

Can You Get a Medical Marijuana Card Without Medical Records?

Can You Get a Medical Marijuana Card Without Medical Records?

By Alex M.

Sometimes getting a medical marijuana recommendation/ID card requires more than a doctor’s visit and a plausible excuse, but sometimes it doesn’t.

Click here to get your medical marijuana card online via telemedicine, there are NO medical records required, and you can be approved in as little as 10 minutes!

In the case of the former, you’ll likely need to provide medical records—a detailed timeline of your development, illnesses, allergies, family history, prescribed medications and other detailed info (vaccinations, x-rays, lab results)—that can be obtained from your primary physician or from any practicing medical doctor once they’ve performed an evaluation.

These records are then given to a licensed medical marijuana doc of your choosing, though as mentioned, their importance is dependent on the doc.

Some pot docs will use your personal medical records to help them confirm your ailment and to prove you’ve been receiving, or trying to receive, medical treatment for it. They might even quiz you about them to back-up your story, ultimately helping to make a more informed diagnosis that could determine how long your rec/card will last.

Other doctors, on the other hand, request them as a mere formality, even if they aren’t used. And that’s not to say it’s always a negative indication of the professionalism of the doctor, it may simply mean that they place much more weight on the evaluation itself. After all, the medical benefits of cannabis are widely appreciated through anecdotal evidence, but everyone reacts differently and medical history most certainly won’t paint a full picture of your candidacy for medical marijuana.

So what if you don’t have medical records due to lack of insurance, a doctor, or just don’t want to provide them; can you still get a medical marijuana card without them?

The ease or difficulty of this process varies by state, but if you’re here in California just heed these easy directions on how to get a weed card and you’ll be pain free without providing official records in no time.

The below process can also be used to get a marijuana card renewal, which is necessary at least once every year, depending on how long your recommendation/card is valid for.

STEP 1: HAVE AN EXCUSABLE OR REASONABLE CONDITION

Getting a recommendation/ID card depends on the validity of why you need one, which dictates whom you visit.

If you want to legally acquire quality medical weed in California, for whatever reason, without the hassle, Proposition 215’s broad definition of “illness for which marijuana provides relief” allows you to give almost any generic reason why—insomnia, muscle aches, stress—without much, if any, documented proof and easily get it. After all, who doesn’t suffer from pain every now and again?

But if you suffer from a more chronic, specific problem and are looking for a more effective alternative to traditional medications or to potentially addictive and deadly painkillers, bring some evidence of your condition like a past prescription medication, herbal remedy or anything you’ve used to try to alleviate your pain.

Side Note: NuggMD recently introduced its online offering for patients seeking medical marijuana doctors in New York.

STEP 2: FIND A MEDICAL MARIJUANA DOCTOR WHO DOESN’T REQUIRE MEDICAL RECORDS

While any licensed California doctor, like your primary physician, can evaluate your condition and prescribe a rec or medical marijuana card, many will only do so to lessen the pains associated with terminal illnesses like cancer. Plus, not all are informed on the type of cannabis to recommend, the dosage, or simply don’t understand medical cannabis’ healing properties. As a result you’ll have to see a doc who specializes in evaluating conditions that could benefit from using medical marijuana.

Not all mmj doctors have the same prerequisites, so providing your medical records can be avoided once you find one who doesn’t need them. And like mentioned earlier, some don’t require them simply because they themselves perform 420 evaluations and make the final call, not because of any shady dealings or malpractice. It just depends on the doctor’s practice and medical philosophy.

How do you choose this doctor?

  • Do some research: Google searches (perhaps for ‘medical marijuana evaluations near me’), Yelp reviews, ask a friend who has a rec or card, check the back of the L.A. Weekly—regardless, you’d prefer someone who’s close, qualified and moderately priced, even if you only have to visit him/her once a year.
  • Use your best judgment: If a doctor is located in a sketchy neighborhood, not in a medical office, and charges a significantly lower fee than most, he/she might not care about your excuse, much less your medical records; as long as you pay the fee/s you’ll always get the rec or ID card (why they’re everywhere and profitable). While this is beneficial to those without records, you potentially run the risk of robbery, physical harm, or even identity theft, not to mention a typically uncomfortable and drawn out in-person experience.
  • Narrow the search: Find 3 to 5 pot docs that you’d consider, visit their website and/or call (if not already known) to ask if your medical history’s necessary until you find one that meets your criteria. If not, repeat the process. Be sure to ask questions pertaining to their service and read the fine print to avoid any scams or extra charges. When you’ve chosen one you’re comfortable with, book an appointment.

STEP 3: VISIT A MEDICAL MARIJUANA DOCTOR THE OLD WAY

Upon arrival you’ll be asked to fill out a brief medical evaluation form like you would as a new patient at any doctor’s office, providing your standard personal info (name, address, email address, phone number, date of birth, social security number). You’ll also be asked to briefly provide a reason/s or condition/s for why you need medical marijuana.

The doctor will ask questions relating to them, along with recalling your past medical conditions and any prior experience with cannabis, recreational and/or medicinal. A good one should have a comprehensive knowledge of marijuana’s various products, their various forms, and how they interact with various medical conditions. Don’t assume the doc will do all the talking or that it’s simply a formality before getting your rec/ID; get your money’s worth and ask questions.

STEP 4: USE NUGGMD (OPTIONAL, BUT RECOMMENDED)

You could deal with the time consuming hassle of above, or you can easily get a fast, affordable, face-to-face online consultation from any computer or mobile device with Wi-Fi and a camera (phone evaluations are also available if you don’t have access to a webcam).

Just visit NuggMD, sign up, fill out a simple medical questionnaire, upload a photo head shot and then meet with a qualified, friendly 420 doctor from the comforts of home in less than ten minutes for only $39. No medical records required! And, for just an extra $20, you can receive a laminated, convenient wallet-sized NuggMD medical cannabis photo ID card.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to be a legal California resident to acquire a medical card as long as you’re as U.S. resident, though it’s only valid in California.

But does a medical marijuana card go on your record? It does if you use the state issued program to get one (like if you get a weed card in New York), but not if you go through a private third party service like NuggMD.

As with seeing any doctor there’s doctor-patient confidentiality, so your personal information remains private, isn’t shared with anyone (insurance companies, government agencies, employers) without your consent, and is securely stored using a HIPAA compliant server.

Once approved you’ll immediately receive a temporary digital copy of your year-long recommendation (until the official signed and stamped copy arrives via mail a couple of days later) that you can use the same day at any dispensary/collective and get your medical cannabis. Or simply stay home and have it delivered directly to your door by using Getnugg.com, where you can compare prices from several nearby cannabis dispensaries in your vicinity and purchase any type of cannabis products — from flowers to tinctures, oils, rubs, vape cartridges, edibles and more.

Follow these steps to get your cannabis card online without medical records quickly and easily!

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Tue, 25 Jul 2017 19:53:48 +0000

Cannabis and Pain Alleviation

Cannabis and Pain Alleviation

It is important to make a statement before this article, and that is:

Cannabis is a lot more than what many think.

It has an awesome number of restorative properties. Cannabis can be a momentary solution for many different neurological and physical issues, and at the same time it is a tragically underutilized remedial.

We all know how dreadful some health conditions can be. But it is not only these health conditions themselves- the treatments for them can also be painful and draining. Medical conditions like Cancer can cause fear by its name alone. According to various scientific research, cannabis not only addresses pain, but many related symptoms such as nausea, loss of appetite, and depression, among others.

In this article, we will be emphatically concentrating on the pain alleviating properties of cannabis.

But before looking at cannabis’ impact on pain, it is imperative for us to know- what is pain?

First off, pain doesn’t originate from the organ that is harmed- it first occurs in the brain. The damaged area can’t prompt any torment- pain is one of the sensations, made by the cerebrum alone, to protect you.

Pain is a simple result of the evaluation of the danger data received by the danger-detecting system, combined with stored information, current information, cognitive data (meaning previous exposure), social exposures, beliefs, and lastly, the sensory data.

And where are all these evaluations happening? In your brain.

Many will have experienced pain abruptly showing up or vanishing. For example, you may have shooting pain one minute and the next, it’s gone. This now-and-again cycle happens in the cerebrum. The agony re-event happens when the mind is given the believable proof that there are threats to the body and it needs ensuring.

There are excessively numerous inquiries on the most proficient method to viably diminish the torment of pain without harming different parts of the body. The most coherent approach towards this is to alleviate your mind first. Yes, when your cerebrum is guaranteed that it is in a sheltered place, by conveying confirmation of well-being to the mind, you can say farewell to your agony, rapidly. However, this is a little tricky.

And what does cannabis do for the pain?

One basic element that cannabis and pain have in common is that their effects are focused in our brain. Agony occurs in the cerebrum, and cannabis has its effect on the brain- this is certain to ring a bell now.

Cannabis not only addresses one type of pain but most types, such as neuropathic pain, muscular pain, psychogenic pain, and lastly, idiopathic pain.

Both THC and CBD, which are the most conspicuous cannabinoids found in cannabis, have their own particular impact on pain- one makes you overlook the pain by energizing you, while the other makes you nod off, which additionally soothes the side effects of pain.

The way THC works on the brain is pretty interesting.

THC has the ability to plug into the cannabinoid receptors, the unique receptors that receive cannabinoid neurotransmitters.  When the THC interacts with these receptors, the neurons in the brain get excited, during which these cannabinoid receptors will not have their usual effect.

Chemical-free and safe Marijuana for better health...

Chemical-free and safe Marijuana for better health…

In simple words, distinctive zones in the cerebrum where cannabinoids are available, get energized without a moment’s delay. What’s more, amidst this, the correspondence and typical operation will be absent. Also, it is here that the cerebrum loses its capacity to judge what is essential, and what isn’t. The valuable outcome of this is that pain turns out to be less vital for your cerebrum because of the excitation.

As announced before, Cannabidiol (CBD) can likewise lighten the agony, and its impact is more physical, instead of mental, which is one reason CBD is favored by individuals who are worried about the mental impacts of this herb (or they otherwise do not want to get high). Another motivation behind why CBD is the best for pain alleviation is that it can treat and address each type of pain at the cellular level.

Agony is loathsome and is something that individuals fear the most. Rather than going for synthetic pain-killers that will have reactions 90% of the time, one can pick the occasional consumption of symptom- and chemical-free cannabis.

References

10 Surprising Benefits of Using CBD to Treat Chronic Pain

Marijuana as Medicine?: The Science Behind the Controversy

Evidence Shows that Marijuana works for Pain, the Medical Reason Most People Want It but Doctors Still Have Questions

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Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 22:25:16 +0000

Munchies: Hostess Ding Dong Ice Cream Sandwiches

Munchies: Hostess Ding Dong Ice Cream Sandwiches

Mrs. Nice Guy

Summertime is now in session, so cool treats are mandatory!

When I found out that Hostess released an ice cream sandwich version of their Ding Dong dessert snack I had to have one. I did what any sane and somewhat stoned person would do and rushed to my local Freddy’s.

The Ding Dong Ice Cream Sandwiches are wrapped individually and come 5 in a pack, each sandwich is 180 calories. The sandwiches are slightly bigger than the unfrozen version of itself and they’re covered in a smooth layer of chocolate coating. Once you bite into it the coating won’t hold up well and it’ll crack and crumble, so they can be a little messy. If you eat it with the wrapper you should be a-okay, or if you wanna get fancy with it you can go full Costanza and eat it with a knife and fork. Once you bite into it you’ll also notice a crunchy chocolate cookie layer and the inside filled with vanilla ice cream. Think a Klondike bar, only better!

Fans of regular Ding Dongs and Ice Cream Sandwiches will definitely love to cool down with this dessert, I only wish they were bigger. While these sandwiches aren’t life changing, they’ll definitely satisfy your sweet tooth cravings…AKA THE MUNCHIES!

Hostess has other ice cream products: they have a Twinkies Cone and Snoballs Bar along with Twinkies, Cupcakes, and Snoballs ice cream. Too bad they didn’t include Chocodiles.

The post Munchies: Hostess Ding Dong Ice Cream Sandwiches appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

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Published at Mon, 17 Jul 2017 20:45:51 +0000

Legal Marijuana Sales Now Underway in Uruguay Pharmacies

Legal Marijuana Sales Now Underway in Uruguay Pharmacies

Legal marijuana sales are underway in Uruguay, the first country to officially legalize the plant for retail sale.

As of today (June 19) in Uruguay, marijuana is being sold in pharmacies throughout the country. As part of the country’s marijuana laws, those 18 and older are authorized to purchase up to 40 grams of marijuana for personal use. In order to combat the black-market, cannabis is being sold tax-free at roughly $1.50 a gram, exponentially cheaper than the price of marijuana in the eight U.S. states that have legalized the plant (where prices range from $10 to $18 a gram).

As part of the new law, first approved in 2013, marijuana clubs where up to 45 members can collectively produce up to 99 plants are also allowed. In addition, anyone 18 and older is authorized to grow up to six cannabis plants at a private residence, for personal use. Regulation for the new industry are overseen by the Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis.

Hannah Hetzer, Senior International Policy Manager at the Drug Policy Alliance, calls the beginning of legal marijuana sales a “historic moment”, and says “Uruguay is boldly demonstrating that concrete alternatives to failed prohibitionist policies are possible.”

“Uruguay’s model will look quite different from the eight U.S. states that have legalized marijuana,” says Hetzer. “There is no one-size-fits-all marijuana legalization system. It’s important for each jurisdiction to tailor marijuana regulation to their local needs and contexts, providing the world with different models to learn from.”

The law that legalized marijuana was first proposed by then-President José Mujica, who was nominated in 2014 for a Nobel Peace Prize.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Wed, 19 Jul 2017 23:00:56 +0000

Alaska Officials Vote to Allow On-Site Consumption of Marijuana at Retail Outlets

Alaska Officials Vote to Allow On-Site Consumption of Marijuana at Retail Outlets

The Alaska Marijuana Control Board’s has voted 3 to 2 to establish rules allowing marijuana to be consumed on-site at licensed retail outlets.

The approved proposal includes a specific set of rules and guidelines that would make Alaska the first state where on-site consumption of recreational marijuana is allowed at retail outlets. These include requiring ventilation, and limiting the amount of marijuana can be consumed. Approval of the rules will open up a 60-day public comment period.

At the meeting board member Brandon Emmett cited news stories about tourists coming to the state, purchasing marijuana and then having nowhere to legally consume it; this is because smoking in public remains illegal, and many hotels don’t allow it. He also brought up the Anchorage Assembly’s passage of a resolution that urges the board to allow consumption of cannabis in pot shops.

“I think it’s time this board adopt something realistic and give those individuals who have no place to consume marijuana some place to do it legally,” said Emmett.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Tue, 18 Jul 2017 18:04:00 +0000

Legal Marijuana Sales Begin this Week in Uruguay

Legal Marijuana Sales Begin this Week in Uruguay

This week Uruguay will officially begin legal sales of marijuana for those 18 and older, over three and a half years after the law legalizing the plant was initially approved by lawmakers.

The legalization of marijuana was first proposed by former-President José Mujica in 2012 as part of a comprehensive package of proposals aimed at improving public safety. Uruguay’s parliament gave final approval to the measure in December 2013, making Uruguay the first country in the world to fully legalize cannabis for retail distribution. This week – over 3.5 years later – legal sales will finally begin.

“This is a historic moment,” says Hannah Hetzer, Senior International Policy Manager at the Drug Policy Alliance. “In recent years, Latin American leaders have decried the staggering human, environmental and financial costs of the War on Drugs in their region. Uruguay is boldly demonstrating that concrete alternatives to failed prohibitionist policies are possible.”

According to Hetzer, the Uruguayan model allows four forms of access to marijuana: medical marijuana through the Ministry of Public Health; domestic cultivation of up to six plants per household; membership clubs where up to 45 members can collectively produce up to 99 plants; and licensed sale in pharmacies to adult residents. Regulation will be overseen by the government’s Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCCA). Sales to minors, driving under the influence of marijuana, and all forms of advertising are prohibited.

“Uruguay’s model will look quite different from the eight U.S. states that have legalized marijuana,” Hetzer continued. “There is no one-size-fits-all marijuana legalization system. It’s important for each jurisdiction to tailor marijuana regulation to their local needs and contexts, providing the world with different models to learn from.”

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Mon, 17 Jul 2017 20:38:26 +0000

Many pot firms strapped with cash

Many pot firms strapped with cash

The Columbian / Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Slip a fresh $20 bill under the bulletproof teller window of Donnie Anderson’s Medex marijuana dispensary — perhaps for a gram of cannabis or some THC-infused toffees — and the legal tender is transformed into something else: drug money.

Though the transaction is legal in California, under federal law that bill is not much different from the contents of a drug cartel’s safe — cash that most banks won’t touch.

So how is Anderson supposed to pay his employees, suppliers or business taxes? He deposits cash, in drips and drabs, into an account held by a limited liability company that his bank thinks is a property management firm.

“The bank doesn’t know what we do,” he said.

If this sounds like money laundering, you’re not far off.

Yet consider this: That same $20 exchanged at Canndescent, another cannabis company, takes a direct and transparent route into the financial system.

When the marijuana cultivator sells its product to a dispensary, one armored car drops off the pot and another picks up the cash payment — and then heads to a downtown Los Angeles branch of the Federal Reserve Bank.

There the cash is deposited into the account of a local credit union, one that’s eager to do business with Canndescent.

“After all the horror stories I’ve heard, it does seem like a little bit of magic,” said Tom DiGiovanni, Canndescent’s chief financial officer.

Indeed, though the same laws apply to Anderson’s dispensary and Canndescent’s farm, the world of cannabis banking is so full of contradictions that one business can truck money to a federal facility while the other is left to play a high-stakes game of hide-and-seek with its cash.

“It’s the early stages of the Wild West,” said California Treasurer John Chiang, who is leading an effort to reform cannabis banking, a problem dating back to 1996 when California legalized medical marijuana.

With recreational use set to become legal next year under Proposition 64, cannabis sales in the state are expected to top $7.5 billion in 2020, up from about $3.3 billion last year, according to data provider New Frontier and cannabis investor network Arcview Group.

But while Proposition 64 broadened the legal use of pot, it did nothing to relax banking regulations.

“It left significant questions unresolved,” Chiang said. “How do you handle the taxation of cannabis dollars and the banking of billions of dollars of transactions that are going to take place here in California?”

Last year, Chiang created a group of cannabis and banking industry trade groups, attorneys, regulators and others, trying to figure out how to bring the cannabis industry into the financial mainstream. But it’s a vexing challenge, and one that cannot be solved by the state alone.

Marijuana is legal for medical use in 29 states and for recreational use in eight, yet the federal Controlled Substances Act lists it alongside heroin and LSD as both dangerous and having no accepted medical use.

And for banks, federal laws are paramount.

Banks and credit unions can guarantee deposits because they have federal deposit insurance. They rely on Federal Reserve systems to make wire transfers, handle electronic payments and process checks. And they all answer to at least one federal regulator.

Banks and credit unions also are required to tell federal authorities if they suspect that their customers might be engaged in illegal activity. And when it comes to following those rules, the stakes are high.

“The FDIC could step in and shut down a bank, and it can do that with very little notice,” said Julie Hill, a law professor at the University of Alabama and former finance industry attorney who has studied cannabis banking. “Nobody’s ever gotten their bank brought back to life after it’s been closed by regulators.”

Because of that, many banks won’t even take the risk.

“From a federal level, it’s illegal,” Jim Brush, chief executive of Summit State Bank in Santa Rosa, Calif., told Chiang’s working group in May. “It really doesn’t matter what California does.”

Still, federal officials have cracked open the door for banks and credit unions.

In 2013, the Justice Department said it would focus its marijuana-enforcement efforts on preventing sales to minors, interstate trafficking and a handful of other crimes.

The following year, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, or FinCEN, part of the U.S. Treasury Department, released guidelines for financial institutions that want to work with marijuana companies. They require additional reporting and demand that banks monitor companies for activities that remain Justice Department priorities.

No clear protections

FinCEN reported that 368 banks and credit unions were serving the industry in March, up from fewer than 300 at the beginning of 2016. But that’s a tiny fraction of the nation’s nearly 12,000 banks and credit unions.

Hill said so few institutions are playing along because FinCEN’s guidelines don’t offer clear legal protection. And some banks don’t want to be in the uncomfortable position of policing cannabis companies.

“How would you know a business isn’t selling to minors unless you’re in the store all the time?” Hill said.

What’s more, with a new administration in the White House and avowed marijuana opponent Jeff Sessions running the Justice Department, it’s not clear whether the feds will take a harder line on pot.

With many cannabis companies unable to get bank accounts, they are often left to deal in cash, which is inconvenient and dangerous.

Take Jerred Kiloh, owner of Higher Path Collective. His Los Angeles dispensary had sales of about $4 million last year, so he owed more than $200,000 in taxes to Los Angeles alone, he told Chiang’s group.

Imagine, Kiloh said, carrying that much cash.

“Right now, at the downtown office of finance, there’s a six-story parking structure 500 yards away,” he said. “I have to walk through what is essentially a homeless encampment with a duffel bag full of cash, walk across the street, go through security and then sometimes stand in line.”

Kyle Kazan, a former area police officer who runs a firm that invests in cannabis growers and retailers, said the lack of access to banking poses big safety risks.

“Real lives are in danger because there’s so much cash in play here,” Kazan said.

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Published at Sat, 15 Jul 2017 13:00:07 +0000

California Assembly Committee Votes Unanimously to Urge Federal Rescheduling of Marijuana

California Assembly Committee Votes Unanimously to Urge Federal Rescheduling of Marijuana

A joint resolution asking Congress to reschedule marijuana on the federal level has been passed unanimously by the Assembly Public Safety Committee.

Senate Joint Resolution 5 was passed by the Assembly Public Safety Committee yesterday with a 7 to 0 vote. In April the resolution was given approval by the state’s full Senate with an overwhelming – though not quite unanimous – vote of 34 to 2.

The resolution “formally requests the United States Congress to pass a law to reschedule cannabis, marijuana, and its derivatives from a Schedule I drug, and for the President of the United States to sign such legislation”.

According to its legislative analysis, the resolution urges:

1) Congress of the United States to pass a law to reschedule marijuana or cannabis and its derivatives from a Schedule I drug to an alternative schedule, therefore allowing the legal research and development of marijuana or cannabis for medical use and allowing for the legal commerce of marijuana or cannabis so that businesses dealing with marijuana or cannabis can use traditional banks or financial institutions for their banking needs, which would result in providing a legal vehicle for those businesses to pay their taxes, including, but not limited to, payroll taxes, unsecured property taxes, and applicable taxes on the products sold in accordance with state and local laws.

2) President of the United States to sign such legislation.

3) The Secretary of the Senate to distribute copies of this resolution to the President and Vice President of the United States, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Majority Leader of the United States Senate, to each Senator and Representatives from California in the Congress of the United States, and to the author for appropriate distribution.

For the full text of Senate Joint Resolution 5, click here.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 13 Jul 2017 17:33:37 +0000

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Some six months after Michigan’s new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act took effect, the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board created by that Act today announced its first meeting.

On Monday, June 26, 2017, at 1:30 p.m., the Board will meet in the first floor auditorium in the State’s G. Mennen Williams Building, the building that houses the State’s Attorney General’s office. (The Williams Building is located at 525 West Ottawa in Lansing.)

The agenda released by the Board announces that this will be the Board’s organizational meeting. As required by the State’s Open Meetings Act, there will also be an opportunity for public comment.

The members of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Board were appointed by Gov. Snyder last month. Chaired by former Michigan House Speaker Rick Johnson, the Board also consists of Donald Bailey, Nichole Cover, David LaMontaine, and Vivian Pickard.

For more information on the activities of Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Facilities Board and the State’s creation of a new regulatory framework for medical marijuana, check back with the Cannabis Law Blog.

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Published at Sun, 18 Jun 2017 16:00:00 +0000