Cannabis Trimming Parties

Cannabis Trimming Parties

As a child of the rural Ontario countryside, I witnessed the great undertaking of making Maple Syrup many times.  For some of my neighbors boiling tree sap into syrup was not only a cause for great labour but also a cause for visitors and late night card games that played out like celebrations.  These farmers would harvest sap like this every Spring working their normal tireless pace around the farm by day and then boiling watery sap to silky syrup till late into the night.  Neighbors and relatives alike stopped by to help or deal a hand or two, the game often ending only when someone fell asleep at the table.  

From tapping to collecting, boiling to perfecting, Maple Syrup production is proof that humans and nature can be partners through the seasons.  I see this in other Canadian products too.  Ontario is famous for its Maple Syrup while British Columbia is famous for its Cannabis- or “BC Bud” as it’s also known worldwide.  I’m sure the fall season in B.C. also sees friends and neighbors gather to help with the huge undertaking of harvesting and trimming the many indoor and outdoor Cannabis crops.

I predict this for Ontario and the other provinces too.  Only after the harvest & trim is finished does the celebration begin.  Or did it begin months ago when those seeds first popped?  In fact I really hope that Canadians get creative with their growing and sharing.  Remember cookie exchange parties?  Why not Cannabis exchange parties?  Heck, make it vegetable exchange parties too!  You grow the THC strains and I’ll grow the CBD strains.  I’m currently growing Green Kale with my Cannabis plants!  Each of our medicine cabinets and fridges will have exactly the strains and veggies we need.  

We Cannabis growers are proudly green-thumbed and ready to celebrate the way other Canadians do when harvesting sap or hay or vegetables!  Growing as a way of life is a big part of what speaks to us as Canadians and I really welcome legalization as a way for many of us to get back to our roots and get back to nature.  We may all find that partnership with nature, feels right to us too.


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Published at Mon, 23 Oct 2017 16:00:08 +0000

Book series looks at growing marijuana

Book series looks at growing marijuana

The Columbian / Associated Press

Book series looks at growing marijuana

They’ve written guides about growing fruit, vegetables, houseplants and more. Now, the authors of a popular gardening series have set their sights on something a little different.

“What’s Wrong with My Marijuana Plant? A Cannabis Grower’s Visual Guide to Easy Diagnosis and Organic Remedies” (Ten Speed Press, 2017), by David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth, is the fifth in their “What’s Wrong With …’ ” series, and is one of the first mainstream gardening books to offer practical advice on a topic some still consider taboo.

“I’ve been interested in medicinal plants for some time,” explained Deardorff. “So it seemed perfectly natural to me to extend our series to ‘What’s Wrong With My Marijuana Plant?’ ”

In the book’s introduction, the authors remind readers that the federal government still considers marijuana an illegal crop. They warn prospective growers to check the laws of their state before planting it. In Washington state, only medical marijuana users can legally grow plants at home.

But, Deardorff says, “Medical marijuana is now legal in 26 states. In some of those states you need a medical recommendation to grow it, but in others even recreation growers can now grow it, so it seemed like the timing was right.”

“Another side to this is that we feel it’s crucially important that any plant to be used medicinally be grown organically, and our book helps people address any problems they encounter during the growing process using organic solutions,” says Wadsworth.

“Our audience is not stoners,” Deardorff adds. “Ninety percent of them are probably older women who are growing marijuana for medicinal uses.”

Aimed at novices

The book, like the earlier books in this series, takes a visual and diagnostic approach that can be especially helpful for novices.

“We focus on the first symptoms a grower can see with the naked eye. So in our book, there’s a picture of what that problem looks like and a detailed description so you can diagnose the problem. Then you can change the growing conditions accordingly,” Deardorff says.

The book is divided into sections based on the parts of the plant, such as leaf, stem, root or flower.

Because so little research has been done on marijuana in the U.S., largely due to its federal legal status, the authors researched the book by interviewing medical marijuana growers around the country, including indoor growers, outdoor growers and home growers.

“We combined the information from these visits with research using publications from the Netherlands and Israel,” Deardorff says. He says those countries are leaders in research on medical marijuana.

“In general, it is a good strong weed,” he says. “It grows well. It grows strong. But like any other plant, it does have issues.”

The most common problem for marijuana plants, he says, is mites. And one common mistake, whether marijuana is being grown outdoors or inside in pots, is not using a potting soil that’s sufficiently light and airy. Plant nutrition is another issue, since nutritional needs change over the life of the plant. That requires different fertilizers. And although marijuana plants are generally robust, they can get powdery mildew or aphids.

“A lot of people are still using pesticides to deal with things when they should really be growing it organically, particularly for a weed like this that may be used medicinally,” he says.

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Published at Thu, 05 Oct 2017 13:00:44 +0000

Washington Supreme Court Rules Random Drug Tests Are Unconstitutional

Washington Supreme Court Rules Random Drug Tests Are Unconstitutional

Washington’s Supreme Court has ruled that random urinalysis tests are unconstitutional.

The ruling, which sets immediate precedent, came after three individuals were charged in Spokane County with DUI in 2015. As a condition of their charges, Cortney Blomstrom, Christopher Cooper, and Brooke Button were forced to undergo regular urine tests (the latter two were charged with driving under the influence of marijuana and had previous criminal records). The three, however, objected to the court order, claiming it to be too invasive.

After taking the case to the Spokane County Superior Court and having their request (to remove the urine test requirement) denied, the case was moved up to the Washington State Supreme Court, which sided with the three and reversed the testing requirement.

“Urinalysis is at least as invasive as a roadblock or a pat-down search,” said the court in their ruling. The tests were found to be in direct violation of an individuals privacy, meaning it violated the fourth amendment which prevents unreasonable search and seizure without

The court did, however, offer a partial dissent, stating that “Judges should not be categorically prohibited from imposing necessary and narrowly tailored release conditions on defendants arrested on probable cause for DUI.”

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Mon, 16 Oct 2017 22:04:38 +0000

Atlanta Mayor Signs Marijuana Decrim Bill Into Law

Atlanta Mayor Signs Marijuana Decrim Bill Into Law

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has signed ordinance 17-O-1152 into law, which reduces the penalty for possession of one ounce of marijuana or less to a maximum of $75, and instructs the Atlanta Police Department to conduct training on the new penalty provision.

The ordinance, introduced by Councilmember Kwanza Hall, eliminates the possibility of jail time for a conviction of possessing one ounce or less of cannabis under the City Code. The maximum penalty would become a fine of $75. Prior to the new law, possessing an ounce or less of marijuana would result in a fine of up to $1000 and up to six months in jail.

“I am pleased to sign this ordinance, which eliminates jail time as a penalty for a conviction for possession of less than an ounce, into law”,said Mayor Reed in a press release. “I also want to thank Councilmembers Keisha Lance Bottoms and Kwanza Hall for their work not only to pass this ordinance, but also to make sure our officers in the Atlanta Police Department receive the appropriate training. People of color, young and low-income people are disproportionately jailed – with sentences up to six months – for possessing small amounts of marijuana. An average of 1,000 people are arrested each year in Atlanta for possession only. We needed to change that. I believe our public safety resources are better directed to stopping and preventing violent crime.”

The new law was passed unanimously earlier this month.

“Today we stand with every parent of Atlanta who is fearful of or has seen their children’s lives destroyed, or careers ruined because of a racist policy that unjustly incarcerated minorities by more than ninety percent,” said Councilmember Hall following the vote. “Reforming the racist marijuana laws on the book in Atlanta has been just one in a number of reforms that I have fought for.”

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 12 Oct 2017 04:49:50 +0000

Weed Porn: G13

Weed Porn: G13

Mrs. Nice Guy

Weed Porn: G13

G13 is a very strong strain of cannabis indica that is the subject of many urban legends. According to some accounts, the CIA, FBI, and other agencies gathered the best strains of marijuana from breeders all over the world. At a super-secret installation at the University of Mississippi, they bred many new super hybrids in the late 1960s. Allegedly, a single cutting of this plant was liberated by an unnamed technician and bred for the masses.

Although the legends are probably not true, G13 delivers effects like no other. If you have the opportunity, definitely partake in this strain.

One of the reasons I got this G13 was because of the urban legend in the description above. It reminded me of the intro scene to Pineapple Express. I really need to get my hands on this stuff again, if I remember right it was a nice high, but it did give me a bit of the munchies.

The post Weed Porn: G13 appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

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Published at Fri, 13 Oct 2017 18:40:13 +0000

Colorado: $1 Billion in Legal Marijuana Sold in First 8 Months of 2017

Colorado: $1 Billion in Legal Marijuana Sold in First 8 Months of 2017

From January 1st of this year to the end of August, there was over $1 billion worth of legal marijuana and marijuana products sold in Colorado.

Colorado marijuana sales have surpassed the $1 billion mark in just eight months this year. In 2016, it took 10 months to reach the same mark. According to The Cannabist, year-to-date sales are up 21% this year compared to the first eight months of 2016, when sales totaled $846 million.

The over $1 billion in legal marijuana sales for 2017 have resulted in over $162 million in taxes for the state. This is garnered from a 15% excise tax on marijuana sales, which was raised in July from 10% (though at the same time marijuana sales were exempted from the states standard 2.95 sales tax).

In total there has been roughly $4 billion in marijuana sold since legal sales began in 2014: $699 million in 2014, $996 million in 2015, $1.3 billion in 2016, and $1.02 billion so far this year.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 12 Oct 2017 06:05:38 +0000

Justice Department Names New DEA Acting Administrator

Justice Department Names New DEA Acting Administrator

The Department of Justice has officially designated Robert W. Patterson as the Drug Enforcement Administration acting administrator.

New DEA Acting Administrator Robert W. Patterson.

Patterson’s appointment comes after the resignation of now-former DEA Chief Chuck Rosenberg, who stepped down because he feels President Trump doesn’t respect the law. Patterson was appointed as DEA’s principal deputy administrator in November 2016. In that role, he served as DEA’s chief operating officer, overseeing all of the agency’s enforcement, intelligence, administrative, and regulatory activities worldwide. He is the highest ranking career special agent at DEA.

Patterson came to this position after serving as DEA’s chief inspector beginning in November 2015. As the chief inspector, he had oversight of the Office of Inspections, the Office of Security Programs, and the Office of Professional Responsibility. Collectively, these offices comprise DEA’s internal affairs, compliance, and security programs and provide guidance and support to DEA Headquarters and Field Offices.

Prior to his appointment as the chief inspector, Patterson served in a variety other positions within DEA, including assistant special agent in charge, and later acting special agent in charge of the DEA Special Operations Division, where he oversaw classified programs, and communication exploitation tools, in support of field operations.

Prior to his assignment at SOD, Patterson was a group supervisor in the agency’s Miami Division, where he led the operations of the Orlando District Office Task Force, and later served as acting ASAC.

Patterson began his career with DEA in 1988 in the New York Division, where he worked numerous racketeering influenced and corrupt organizations, known as RICO, investigations. He was also part of a special program established to combat the growing opioid epidemic and associated violence in the greater New York area.

At this point it’s unclear how long Patterson will remain as acting administrator before a permanent DEA Chief is named.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 05 Oct 2017 03:46:20 +0000

World Anti-Doping Agency Removes Cannabidiol (CBD) from Prohibited Substances List

World Anti-Doping Agency Removes Cannabidiol (CBD) from Prohibited Substances List

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has officially removed cannabidiol (CBD) from their 2018 list of prohibited substances.

“Cannabidiol is no longer prohibited”, states a WADA document titled Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes, 2018 Prohibited List. WADA is however banning synthetic cannabinoids such as K2 and spice.

“Synthetic cannabidiol is not a cannabimimetic; however, cannabidiol extracted from cannabis plants may also contain varying concentrations of THC, which remains a prohibited substance,” the document notes.

Given that CBD is allowed but THC isn’t, athletes hoping to use the substance without failing a drug test will need to make sure they use CBD derived from hemp, or CBD that has been entirely separated from any traceable level of THC.

WADA’s threshold for THC is 150 nanograms per milliliter of blood.

The document listing this change, among others, can be found by clicking here.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 10:56:21 +0000

Atlanta City Council Unanimously Approves Marijuana Decriminalization Ordinance

Atlanta City Council Unanimously Approves Marijuana Decriminalization Ordinance

In a unanimous vote Atlanta’s full City Council has given approval to a marijuana decrim measure.

Today the council unanimously approved Ordinance 17-O-1152, introduced by Councilmember Kwanza Hall on March 20th.

“Today we stand with every parent of Atlanta who is fearful of or has seen their children’s lives destroyed, or careers ruined because of a racist policy that unjustly incarcerated minorities by more than ninety percent,” said Hall following the vote.  “Reforming the racist marijuana laws on the book in Atlanta has been just one in a number of reforms that I have fought for.

Hall continued; “And one of the leaders who recognized the unfairness and harshness of the law was Dr. George Napper, who was our city’s first African American Chief of Police, and I’d like to thank him for his support”.

This legislation was one in a series of justice reform policies Councilman Hall has introduced, including “Ban the Box” which passed in 2014, the creation of the Pre-Arrest Diversion Pilot Program in 2015, a law enforcement transparency and accountability measure and legislation to end broken windows policing in 2016.

One of the most powerful speakers during the vote was Charnette Trimble of Council District 4.  “You destroy the black male, and you destroy the black family unit.”

The ordinance changes the penalty in the Atlanta Municipal code for possession of marijuana less than an ounce from the “general penalty” –which is a fine of up to $1000 and up to six months in jail–to a maximum fine of $75 and no jail time.

The legislation had been held since May. A key fact presented during the debate is that in Atlanta, the overwhelming number of arrests for marijuana-related offenses are African Americans (92%), even though studies have determined usage is at similar levels across racial demographics.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Mon, 02 Oct 2017 21:16:40 +0000

A growing problem: How to lighten carbon footprint of cannabis farms

A growing problem: How to lighten carbon footprint of cannabis farms

The Columbian / Associated Press

A growing problem: How to lighten carbon footprint of cannabis farms

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Consider a typical cannabis farmer, growing an indoor crop.

In a protected, controlled environment, they can grow a profitable mix of high-potency, medicinal marijuana and any number of milder strains appealing to a new market.

But the venture comes with both a business and social overhead: high energy bills and a heavy, carbon footprint.

“It’s a big problem,” said Tim Hade, co-founder of micro-grid company Scale. “It has an impact far beyond cannabis consumption.”

A recent study estimated a single, indoor marijuana plant takes the equivalent of 70 gallons of oil to grow. Energy demand at Colorado’s largest utility grew about 2 percent after marijuana was legalized.

Hade said the growing industry could wipe out gains the country made in the last decade that kept energy consumption stable even as the population and economy grew. As the legalized marijuana industry expands in California, it could seriously challenge state goals to reduce greenhouse emissions.

The cannabis industry is starting to address the issue. Startups are hunting for ways to make growing more efficient. Farmers are innovating and experimenting.

Evan Mills, an energy and climate change scientist based in California, said the cannabis industry could make efficiency gains in almost every step of its process. According to Mills’ research, the total amount of energy used to power marijuana farms is equivalent to powering 2 million homes, with emissions equal to 3 million U.S. cars.

Mills said the key change in the industry is a trend toward large-scale cannabis cultivation “which may prove to be far more energy intensive” than the current collection of small-growers.

Scale, based in New York, combines solar, battery storage, and natural gas generators in a system that can cut energy cost by up to 35 percent.

Hade, an Air Force veteran and Stanford Graduate School of Business grad, said the system uses excess heat from generators to fuel air conditioning. With about 30 percent of a farmer’s overhead spent on fuel and electricity, he said, “you have to be sophisticated about energy management.”

J.P. Martin, founder of GrowX, a company in the cannabis accelerator Gateway, has focused his company on making indoor growing more efficient. The startup has produced prototypes for an aeroponic growing system, with sensors, lights and a mesh growing medium. It’s testing the system with two customers.

Natural approach

Martin said the system uses less energy and water than hydroponic growing, and eliminates possible impurities and disease developed from soil.

Cannabis grown indoors is often believed to be more potent — and is more expensive — than crops grown outdoors.

“Traditional farming is a broken model,” Martin said.

But even the promise of new technology — including energy saving LED lighting, sensor-filled growing pods and a network of artificial intelligence and high-efficiency electronics — may not be enough.

“In this warming world, indoor farming is an environmentally unaffordable luxury,” Mills said. “Even deep energy savings leave indoor grows as energy-intensive as most ordinary buildings.”

Some farmers have taken a traditional, natural approach to growing.

Cyril Guthridge, owner and operator of Waterdog Herb Farm in Mendocino County, Calif., plants outdoors. He searches for the right combination of plants and environment to produce high-quality strains of marijuana on his 160 acre homestead.

He has several friends growing indoors and producing great crops, he said. The process can produce high-quality crops, but is usually three times more expensive, he said.

But Guthridge wants to fill a niche for high-quality, naturally grown marijuana. And his farm is off the grid, powered by renewable sources.

“Nature is providing us with a very good environment,” he said.

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Published at Tue, 03 Oct 2017 00:35:56 +0000